Sunday, February 22, 2009

The Current State of the ART Market Series # 10- Sara Tecchia- Gallerista & Owner of Sara Tecchia Roma NY Gallery




This is installment #10 of The Current State of the ART Market Series. This one is going to my fabulous, glamorous and knowledgeable red hair friend and Gallerista, Sara Tecchia owner of Sara Tecchia Roma NY Gallery . Sara is not only a great gallerist but also, a perfect hostess @ her home. With the opening of Corey Arnold show @ her gallery February 26, 2009, ARTmostfierce wanted to catch up with Sara . Lets see what Sara is sharing with us!

Photos- Sara Tecchia Roma Gallery NY


Ruben Natal-San Miguel- Please tell us how such a fabulous glamour girl like you got into the art business? How long ago? What triggered it?

Sara Tecchia-I'm a very independent thinker/workaholic and needed to find a profession that would cater to these needs. In 2003 I graduated with honors in Political Science, International Affairs at La Terza Universita' di Roma and was at a crossroads. What to do? I didn't have a particular talent or disposition towards anything in particular. I had studied photography during college and some of my work had been exhibited. I thought: "Great, I'll move to NY, pursue graduate studies in Contemporary Art and take it from there" and this I did, at Christie's NY. I was very naive and uneducated in the matter. Thus, after confronting myself with those who set the paradigms of contemporary art I quickly realized that creating art wasn't my talent while finding, promoting and fostering the careers of emerging and mid career artists was a more realistic possibility. Thus, I opened Sara Tecchia Roma New York on September 15, 2005.


RNSM- I always admired your knowledge , professionalism and charm...I mean you are a great hostess @ home also... something that some art dealers can lack @ times...Is it hard to be so composed at all times?

ST-I've never been defined as composed: I like it. I believe that it all comes down to extreme organization and attention to detail, planning ahead of time. I never do things last minute. I notice everything and try to troubleshoot in my mind before problems occur so I know what to expect. As for entertaining I enjoy bringing people together and think of the salons led by the likes of Madame de Staël and Gertrude Stein. When people gather and are comfortable the conversations that generate lead to ideas - ideas to enthusiasm - enthusiasm to action.


RNSN- How do you come about choosing your artists for your gallery?

ST-There isn't an established method. Every time is different: introductions, artist submissions. You never know when or where it will happen. That's the beauty of my profession.


Corey Arnold
The Wave, 2003
Bering Sea, Alaska
Chromira C-Print
30 x 44 inches
Edition 1 of 6

RNSM- Photojournalist Corey Arnold, is part of the stable of your gallery...how did you find him? I mean he is very popular. Please explain. Tell us a bit about Corey.




CoreyArnold_Chris_and_Little_Kitty_2004



ST-I first encountered Corey through an image that had nothing to do with his Fish-Work photography: a hefty man laying on a bed with an equally, if not more, hefty cat. I was curious, explored his website and discovered his life/life-style and was captivated by his courage and aesthetics. Corey shows a side of the sea that is unfamiliar to most of us. His images elude the stereotypical narrative of the sea. Otherwise I would have not been attracted to the work. There's a sublime quality to the imagery along with undeniable beauty.

Corey Arnold
Opilio Morning, 2006
Bering Sea, Alaska
Chromira C-Print
30 x 44 inches
Edition 1 of 6


RNSM- Corey Arnold is your next show at Sara Tecchia Roma New York gallery. Why now ?

ST-Although the show was planned one year ago it's the right moment: with times being so dire people need to remember the beauty of their natural surroundings however distant and unapproachable they may seem.

Corey Arnold
Hyse, 2005

Mahemn, Norway
Chromira C-Print
30 x 40 inches
Edition 1 of 6


RNSM- What do you think about the current economic market now and its effects on the ART world? and Are you taking any kind of measurements or plan of action to weather this climate?

ST-Everybody is experiencing different types of issues in connection with the current crisis, dependent upon on the amount of years in the business and personal experience. There is an ongoing correction and this is not a bad thing. Not everybody is gifted with the rare talent that allows one to be an artist on a professional level and the same applies to art dealers, not everybody possesses the necessary business savvy. Too many galleries have opened in recent years without a strong overall vision. For a gallery to have a possibility of success it's not enough to have a few artists and wall space. There must be a reason. The vision is the reason and is the driving force when times are tough. The program is my main focus and the program is made by a group that must remain strong and confident and not by one or two artists. I avoid reading about all the bad. It's depressing and doesn't help. I keep a very strong focus on what I'm doing, allow few factors to influence my path and work more now than I've ever done. Times are slow for everybody, it's a common status but the great news is that the curve will eventually turn. Hopefully during this "sabbatical" artists, curators, critics and dealers will stop to ponder, bond and innovation will arise.

Corey Arnold
Matthew and the Sleeper, 2006
Bering Sea, Alaska
Chromira C-Print
30 x 40 inches
Edition 1 of 6


RNSM- You currently did an art fair in Bologna, Italy...,Can you tell us your experience? Good? Bad?

ST-Bologna was a surprise. It was my first venture in my homeland and we were greeted with open arms. Sales were strong and consistent. I realized that attitudes and personal situations aren't universal. Trust is a big factor where sales are concerned.


RNSM- Now in March 09 , you are also @ SCOPE NY in Lincoln Center ... Can please tell us what are you showcasing? Any additional thoughts?

ST- At Scope-New York I'm showcasing new oil paintings by Paul Jacobsen, large scale 3D photographs by Sebastian Denz, Robert Brinker's cut-paper drawings and David Fried's sound activated sculptures. I feel confident and look forward to a fun week. I truly enjoy meeting new artists, curators, collectors and reconnecting with those I haven't seen in a while. Right now it's important to not nurture high expectations. Whatever comes I take as unexpected surprise and a small victory.


RNSM- How you develop a collectors base? What steps do you take to keep a collectors base even at challenging times like now?

ST-When I opened the gallery I was absolutely unknown and didn't have any connections. Thus, I focused on marketing and branding. I did a lot of advertising, which involved listing the name of the four artists I was then showing and listing my cell phone number. The first art fair I did was Scope Hamptons nine months after opening the space, which allowed me to meet collectors that soon after became clients. Since then I had many fortunate chance encounters with seasoned collectors who share my taste and appreciated/appreciate the facts that my artists are very active, have strong resumes, and fair prices. The most important thing to me is to be just towards all parties involved. I'm not interested in the one time sale. It would have been easy to inflate prices from the get go but I knew that in the long run it would have worked against me. Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler stated that there was a strong reasoning that backed Picasso's prices. I work in the same manner. I seek true patrons who purchase art because they absolutely need to live with the piece of their choice and not because they get a rush out of closing the deal at a certain discount. I always wonder if collectors understand that a good chunk of the money from the sale goes towards paying the printer, framer, shipper, buying supplies, studio rent, insurance etc. It's a whole chain of people who benefit from the sale and keep their business afloat, not only the artist and dealer. If sales stop a very large group suffers. It's important that this be known and collectors understand that this is the time to pick a handful of galleries and help out as much as they possibly can. This is the sense of true patronage.


RNSM- What suggestions or ideas can you provide for a new artist seeking gallery representation now?

ST-Truth be told it's not a good time to seek gallery representation. Every time a gallery takes on a new artist it's a big financial risk that involves large expenses. My advice is focus on your work, don't think of the possible returns, wait.

Corey Arnold
Crab Gate, 2008

The Bering Sea, Alaska
Chromira C-Print
30 x 40 inches
Edition 1 of 6


RNSM- Any final thoughts Sara...tell us what is in your mind now?

ST- What's on my mind is to: stay positive, focus, try not to worry too much about the downturn as it's only temporary, enjoy life. My daily mantra that keeps me grounded is: "It's not supposed to be easy" and "Sara, you can do this".

RNSM-Thank you Sara! See you @ Corey Arnold's opening 2/26/09!

2 comments:

Tema said...

Ruben,

Your interview series is the bomb.

It is so fascinating to read these different perspectives on how to think about what is happening in the art world right now.

Sara's optimism is inspiring. I like her mantras.

Tema

ruben said...

Tema:
Thank you!
Stay tuned...more coming up!